Monthly Archives: July 2016

Celebrate National Chicken Wing Day in Gaylord, Michigan

By: Gaylord Tourism Bureau

wings from their fb lndscpTap 32

When it comes to hot wings we’ll be your wing-man.  Guess you could say we’re traditionalists.  We like wings in their “original “natural state (bones in) Buffalo style and when we say original, we’re referring to the original brand Frank’s Red Hot Sauce.

“In 1964 Frank’s Redhot® Cayenne Pepper Sauce was used as the secret ingredient for the first ever Buffalo wings in Buffalo, New York, putting it on the map and starting the flavor craze that has led to consumers obsession with all things Buffalo-flavor.” Hence the name Buffalo Wings!

In celebration of #NationalChickenWingDay today, July 29, we asked you, “where is the best place for wings in the Gaylord area?”

Wings 2 josh picBennethum’s

Asian zing, parmesan, lime, teriyaki, sweet and savory, barbeque, spicy barbeque we’ve got you covered.  There is something about these messy little, meat lacking, sauce laden, finger lickin’, lip smacking, delights that cause you to lose all etiquette unleashing the primal caveman in you as you eat with your hands shamelessly chewing meat off a bone.

The locals have voted and are sharing Gaylord’s best kept secrets on where you can get your wing fix on.

Here are a few favorites you will want to try on your next visit:

Bennethum’s Northern Inn (just south of Gaylord across from Otsego Lake on Old 27) Joyce Farms free range chicken drumettes feature a house-made garlic-chili-herb hot sauce with Jalapeno ranch dip. Another favorite is their Asian Wings

Tap 32 – (directly downtown Gaylord) Savory, Sweet and spicy asian chicken wings.

Treetops Resort – (Just east of town on Wilkinson Rd.) A variety of creative takes on the classic wing from traditional to Jack Daniels Glaze and…Blueberry Pomegranate?!

Last, but certainly not least…LaSenorita keeps the tradition alive (downtown Gaylord just east of the railroad tracks) 10 chicken wings sauced and tossed in your choice of flavor — original, hot honey, chipotle BBQ, garlic pepper. Around here locals know Monday night is wing night.

Blueberry Wings crppdTreetops Sports Bar

Follow link for complete details on restaurants mentioned and other dining options Dining>>>

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Paddle the Jordan or 5 other rivers

Out See Go by Chris Engle, contributor

Have you seen the new fountain on the lawn of the Otsego County Courthouse? It’s been a busy spot this summer as a gathering place for Alpenfest revelers and as a place where teenagers chase virtual Pokemon characters with their cell phones. A prophecy made during a push to make Gaylord more friendly to pedestrians proclaimed that a water feature in an otherwise dry downtown area will draw people in – and the prophecy has been fulfilled.

But there’s something you may have overlooked about the fountain which consists of a granite boulder set over a circular pool. Five streams of water occasionally leap from the pool and splash onto the rock, sending rivulets trickling down the giant stone in all directions.

That’s the key: Five streams.

The design phase of the courthouse lawn project took input from the people of Gaylord and a recurring suggestion was for a fountain which would, in some shape or form, represent the waterways that originate in Otsego County. Five streams – the AuSable, Black, Manistee, Pigeon and Sturgeon rivers – all start here. It’s something we’re proud of and the new fountain is a way for us to spread the word to visitors to our town. So far the message has been well received.

There’s one stream that’s not represented by the fountain because it is just slightly outside the borders of our county. Even so, I still consider the Jordan River as one of ours – maybe even moreso than the AuSable which is rightfully claimed by the trout-centric town of Grayling to the south.

I’ve written about the Jordan River before so I won’t go into detail about how it is born from ice-cold springs near Elmira, winds through 18,000 acres of wild forests, feeds a federal hatchery’s 3 million lake trout with fresh water and empties into one of Michigan’s largest inland lakes – Lake Charlevoix, with 62 miles of coastline – at East Jordan.

Wide enough to float in a canoe or kayak, the Jordan River still has plenty of obstacles to maneuver around. Photo by Chelsea Engle

Wide enough to float in a canoe or kayak, the Jordan River still has plenty of obstacles to maneuver around. Photo by Chelsea Engle

Instead, I’ll take you on a short float of its midsection by canoe, which my wife and I did last weekend to beat the heat and you should too as long as this hot weather persists.

We dropped the canoe at Webster Bridge, about six miles south of East Jordan as the crow flies, then spotted my car about four miles downstream at Rogers Road. Unless you want to hitchhike back upstream to your starting point – thumbing for a ride in the midday sun on the shoulder of M-66 is not my idea of fun – then you’ll need to take two cars and park (spot) one at your planned end point.

Webster Bridge, a popular put-in spot on the Jordan River. Photo by Chris Engle

Webster Bridge, a popular put-in spot on the Jordan River. Photo by Chris Engle

There were about a dozen people either putting in or taking out at Webster Bridge when we got there and loaded our canoe with fishing rods, snacks and sunscreen. The blazing noontime sun had no apparent effect on the spring-fueled river which stays somewhere around 50 degrees throughout the summer and stings with your first step in.

“Don’t worry, your feet get numb after a few minutes,” a man joked from his canoe pulled up at the bank.

With a light shove from the bank we were immediately carried away in our canoe. Just 20 feet wide and two feet deep, the Jordan is deceivingly swift. We drifted at a fast walking pace without paddling and often had to steer around deadfalls or under overhanging cedar trees. Snagging on one of these obstacles could easily cause the canoe to roll over and that’s why our camera, phone and keys were locked in a water-tight dry box in the middle of the boat.

In an instant I saw Chels relax in her seat and start to take in the sights and sounds of her first ever river canoe trip. This was only my third time floating a small river – and the second time on the Jordan – and I was falling right into relaxation mode with her.

The Jordan River flows under a canopy of overhanging cedars but plenty of sunshine still makes it through in the middle of the day. Photo by Chelsea Engle

The Jordan River flows under a canopy of overhanging cedars but plenty of sunshine still makes it through in the middle of the day. Photo by Chelsea Engle

It’s hard not to get caught up in the scenery of wildflowers, dancing damsel flies and singing blue jays. Every so often a submerged log slams the keel and jars your attention back on where the current is taking you. There’s a lot to take in because, thanks to the current carrying you swiftly along, the scenery is ever changing.

The only fish photo we managed to get the whole trip -- the small but spunky trout like to jump and throw the hook. Photo by Chelsea Engle

The only fish photo we managed to get the whole trip — the small but spunky trout like to jump and throw the hook. Photo by Chelsea Engle

Fishing from the canoe is difficult as I could only get one or two casts in under the low-hanging branches before I had to change our course with my paddle. If you’re in to trout fishing – and there are plenty of spunky brookies and browns ready to test your ability – then I recommend pulling up to a sandbar and working the river’s deep pools and undercut banks that way.

In two hours we’d covered about 4 or 5 miles of river and had stopped a couple times to cast, swim and snack. We moved slower than everyone else – about 15 kayaks passed us on the way – but our butts were just starting to get sore in our seats when we pulled up to our end point.

A giant willow marks the take-out point at Rogers Road. Photo by Chelsea Engle

A giant willow marks the take-out point at Rogers Road. Photo by Chelsea Engle

The Jordan – and all the other area rivers for that matter – have outfitter services that will gladly set you up with a canoe, kayak, tube or raft for the day and give you a ride to/from the river, making spotting a car or hitchhiking unnecessary. This weekend is going to be another hot one, so pick a river and stay cool.

Information on rivers, outfitters and rentals: http://goo.gl/AYmGhR

Chris Engle is an avid outdoorsman and outdoor columnist. He is a stay-at-home dad in Hayes Township, Otsego County. Contact him at englemobile@gmail.com.

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Biking in Gaylord Michigan: Fun Half-Day Excursions

Northern Michigan Biking is at it’s best starting right here in Gaylord.

Gaylord To Vanderbilt:
7.6 miles, round-trip 15.6. Expect open farmlands and two tunnels. Once you arrive in Vanderbilt, fuel up at the Elkhorn Grill, 8294 Mill St. Open seven days a week, this restaurant is known for its great burgers, pizza and spirits. Breakfast is served 7:00 a.m. to noon. Another great spot: Trail Town Tavern, 6461 Old 27 South. Opens at 11:00 a.m. daily.

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Vanderbilt to Wolverine:
10.9 miles, 21.8 round-trip. A gorgeous section of trail, this stretch has four miles with no road access as you pass through Stewart’s Creek Marsh. Pause to take in the wildlife and hear multiple bird calls. This section of trail also crosses the Sturgeon River twice and the west branch of the Sturgeon near Wolverine. You’ll arrive in Wolverine at the local riverside park. Keep going up the hill to the Whistle Stop, 4853 Webb Road, on the east side of the expressway and across the street from Shultz’s Party Store. Enjoy a full menu, though we recommend one of their delicious sub sandwiches. Open M-T-W 8 to 3, Th-F 8 to 9, Sun 8 to 8. 231-525-9188

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Wolverine To Indian River:
9.6 miles, 19.2 miles round-trip. This section of the trail runs parallel to the Sturgeon River, with a nice rustic campground two miles north of Wolverine – Haakwood State Forest Campground – if you’re interested in an overnight stop. Another mile north of the campground you’ll find the Rondo Canoe Access site, where the trail crosses the river. Stop here for a scenic picnic spot, even a swim in the river.

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Spend some time in Indian River, which is home to Burt Lake State Park. This is not far from the trail which now also connects to the North Eastern State Trail in this location and features a modern campground and beach. Local public shoreline Devoe Beach on Burt Lake also isn’t far off the trail Stop for ice cream at Dairy Mart, 3448 S. Straits Highway, across from the trailhead and the local Chamber of Commerce building. A nearby canoe livery, Big Bear Adventures, offers bike shuttle service. 231-238-8181.

Click Here for other tours and biking information,

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